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Cereal smackdown – muesli vs granola

muesli vs granola

Are you a diehard devotee of granola or do you prefer your healthy breakfast with a little less crunch? Do you think muesli got a raw deal whilst granola evolved into muesli plus?

It’s a cereal smackdown but who will win the battle of muesli vs granola?

The difference between granola and muesli

If you stood the main ingredients of muesli and granola side by side they would be fairly similar. A healthy breakfast of wholegrains, nuts, seeds, and dried fruit, the major difference between granola and muesli is that muesli is raw whilst granola is baked. To facilitate this baking, and turn raw wholesome muesli into crunchy granola, oil and sugar are added. But there is more to granola than just oil and sugar, and in fact it never evolved from muesli at all.

Which came first – muesli or granola?

Most of us are by now familiar with the story of Bircher muesli and how it came about. But did you know that Bircher muesli was actually the first muesli invented? Never intended as a breakfast food, Swiss muesli was the poster child of healthy living. Other parts of Europe soon caught on, enticed by the clean image of fresh mountain air and pastures green. By 1960, commercial muesli was widely available.

Granola began life in the United States yet it was not the lovechild of muesli and flapjack at all. Muesli and granola both came into being around the end of the nineteenth century but the original granola was made from wheat, not oats.  It was not until the 1960s that fruit and nuts were added by health conscious hippies, and commercial granola was not available until the 1970s. As it turns out, the two cereals may share many similarities but are in fact completely different things.

Muesli vs granola

So, other than grains, nuts, seeds and fruit, what’s in the bag? Many commercial brands of muesli may have sugar and milk powder added. If your muesli makes the milk taste rich and sweet, chances are it has plenty of both. Gourmet muesli has far less, if any, of these additions. Granola will have some form of fat, and some form of sweetener, added. What these actually are will vary. Commercial varieties of granola are unlikely to be made with butter as it would turn rancid quickly, but they can contain high amounts of unhealthy hydrogenated or trans fats. Sugar content will vary from refined white sugars and corn syrup to the more acceptable face of honey or maple syrup. Even then, quantity counts.

Muesli is served cold, with milk or juice added. It can be soaked, as in Bircher muesli or overnight oats, or even cooked and served hot like porridge. Muesli is pretty versatile but you probably wouldn’t want to snack on a dry handful straight from the box. Granola, on the other hand, was seemingly made for to be eaten naked and unadorned as a snack. Usually served cold, with or without milk, it is not unheard of to serve granola with hot milk. Granola is also an important feature of a granola bowl, smoothie bowl, or acai bowl.

Yet muesli got stuck with the health-food-as-penance reputation whilst granola got to be the good time girl. The acceptable face of oat eating. Both may have began life as health foods, but by the time the food industry got its wicked way neither muesli or granola could claim to be health foods.

Thankfully things have changed and most gourmet granola and muesli are full of the healthy grains, fruits, nuts and seeds that make cereal and milk the ideal healthy breakfast. But is muesli better than granola? Muesli may be less moreish, largely because it has no fat or sugar, but gourmet granola is not all about butter and syrup. Most of our healthy granola has no added sugar and is made with healthy fats.

Toasted muesli vs untoasted muesli

What even is toasted muesli? Is there a difference between granola and toasted muesli? Well, toasted muesli sits somewhere between granola and muesli. It can be made with no sugar or oil, but a little of each helps it along. Toasted muesli won’t clump together into crunchy clusters like granola can, but the toasting adds an extra dimension of texture and flavour. Gourmet granola sometimes has more in common with toasted muesli than it does with granola. Which is no bad thing.

Can you make granola from muesli?

Well, yes you can. But why would you want to when there are so many delicious healthy alternatives available? Here’s some of our favourite healthy granola, all baked by hand here in Australia.

Apple Supreme Paleo, gluten-free granola

This one is grain-free as well as gluten-free. A blend of fruit, nuts and seeds for the perfect Paleo granola.

 

Cranberry Crunch Granola

A classic double baked muesli. Made with Australian pesticide-free almonds, cranberries, pecans and cinnamon alongside organic rolled oats.

 

Maple Nut Crunch, gluten-free vegan granola

The gluten-free version of our award winning granola. A gourmet granola with quinoa and puffed buckwheat instead of oats. Because contrary to popular belief, oats are not gluten-free.

 

Maple Nut Crunch Granola

An award winning granola made with agave and maple syrup.

 

Spelt and Agave Nut Crunch Granola

A healthy breakfast idea made with ancient grain spelt as well as organic rolled oats. Uniquely favoured with cinnamon and a touch of cardamom.

Here is a great Bircher Muesli: Fig & Apricot Bircher.

 

Explore our range of healthy cereals here, or head over to our online store where our healthy breakfast cereals are available to buy in bulk.

 

So who wins the cereal smackdown? We think both muesli and granola are absolute winners. Aaah.


This article was reproduced on this site only with permission from our parent company operafoods.com.au the “Gourmet Online Wholesale Grocer”. See the original article here:- Cereal Smackdown – Muesli vs Granola

Can you eat granola on keto?

keto granola

We all know that cereals are carbs, right? And that carbs are the enemy of ketosis. But can you eat granola on keto?

What is the keto diet?

Keto is short for ketogenic. The keto diet is a very low-carb, high-fat diet that may help you lose weight and benefit your health.

How does the keto diet work?

As the name suggests, the aim of the keto diet is to put your body in ketosis. A metabolic state that enables the body to become more efficient at burning fat for energy, ketosis is said to reduce blood sugar and regulate insulin levels. In ketosis, your body uses fat for fuel instead of carbohydrates, yet normally the metabolism relies on glucose for energy. Limiting intake of carbs reduces the availability of glucose, causing the metabolic pathways to shift direction and burn fat for energy instead.

Keto macros

The principles behind keto are not quite as simple as just reducing carbs. Successful ketosis relies on a ratio of macronutrients that will not only be slightly different for each individual but will also alter over time and according to changing variables. Measuring the macronutrients of carbs, protein and fat ensures optimal calorie intake but also affects the equilibrium of ketosis. You can start your keto diet on a certain ratio but from there it is all about observation and fine-tuning.

The standard ratio for keto is 10% carbs, 20% protein, 70% fat. Guidelines recommend levels between: 5-10% carbs, 15-30% protein, 60-75% fat.

Although foods are generally classed in groups according to the main macronutrient, most (if not all) foods contain a proportion of each. So, when calculating, the entire macronutrient composition must be taken into account.

How many carbs per day on keto?

To get from a percentage to a usable measurement, such as grams, you need to do some calculations based on your overall daily calorie target. You also need to know that carbs provide 4 kcal energy per gram.

For instance, on 2000 kcal a day, 10% carbohydrate would be 200 kcals. Divide 200 by 4 and you get a carb goal of 50g per day. When calculating carbs, you need to use the figure for net carbs, as oppose to total carbs. The numbers for net carbs do not include fibre, as this is not absorbed by the body and therefore provides no energy. On the other hand, the numbers for total carbs include the grams of fibre.

Healthy fats for keto

A successful keto diet is as much about quality as it is quantity. A diet based around whole natural foods, with a focus on nutrient density and macronutrients is as important on keto as any other eating plan.

Whilst saturated fats are accepted as vital sources of nutrients, there are a wide range of plant-based fats that support overall health. Nuts and seeds, and their derivative oils, as well as coconut oil and olive oil are all healthy fats for a keto diet.

How much protein on keto?

It can be easy to get too much protein on a keto diet. When you eat too much protein it may inhibit ketosis as the body can convert amino acids (the building blocks of protein) into glucose. As protein releases the same amount of energy as carbohydrates, the calculation for optimal intake is the same. Again, nuts and seeds are recommended sources on the keto diet. A pretty much perfect food, they are low in carbohydrate, and high in protein as well as healthy fats.

Did you know that almonds are one of the most versatile nuts for a keto diet?

Keto breakfast

Breakfast is hard enough when you are gluten-free, but low-carb? A potential minefield.

Nutritionally speaking, the best foods for  a healthy breakfast are believed to be grains, dairy and fruit, and the benefits of cereal and milk are widely accepted. Eggs are the go-to ingredient for a keto breakfast, closely followed by pork products such as bacon and sausages. But what if you want a keto breakfast with no eggs? What if you are mindful of saturated fat and excess protein? Not to mention sodium. It’s an Atkins nightmare all over again. And then there is time. Or not. Very few people can manage to cook, let alone eat, a hot meaty breakfast before heading out the door in the early morning. Sure, where there’s a will there’s a way but that’s why breakfast cereal was invented yeah? Convenient, crunchy, and easy on the digestion.

Keto cereal

Breakfast cereal is generally made from grains. Aka cereals. Aka carbs. Which of course are a big nay-nay for the fat-burning bod.

What cereal can you eat on the keto diet?

Some breakfast cereals are lower in carbs than others yet will still use up your entire weekly carb allowance in one glorious bowl. The market has got wiser as far as individual dietary preferences are concerned and the available range is far wider than it once was. You do need to check your labels carefully though. Grain-free is your best bet, but may come with whopping amounts of sugar. Better still would be a breakfast cereal labelled keto. Imagine that 😉

Can you eat granola on keto?

The short answer is pretty much no. But keto granola does exist. Based on nuts and seeds, with a handful of healthy fat thrown in, keto granola is just the thing for a cold and crunchy keto breakfast.

Can you have milk on a keto diet?

But what about the milk? It is that combo of cold cold milk and crunchiness that makes granola such a lovely thing. Can you have milk on a keto diet?

Dairy milk, from cows or goats, might be chock full of nutrients including protein and fats, but they also come with a moderately high amount of carbs. One cup of cows milk has 12g net carbs. Goats milk has marginally less.

And it is not just dairy. Many alternative milks come with a ton of carbs too. Oat milk (unsurprisingly) has 17g net carbs per cup. Rice milk is even higher at 21g.

Also unsurprisingly, almond milk is THE milk of choice for keto, with just 1g of carbs per cup. Yay. If you make your own almond milk it tastes better and has no sweeteners of fillers that you didn’t put there yourself.

What about keto-friendly fruit?

A bowl of granola needs a bit of fruit, but unfortunately this is also a keto minefield. Our advice is to go for berries, some of the lowest carb fruit around. At between 6-9g carbs in half a cup of raspberries, strawberries, or blueberries, they certainly aren’t for everyday but make an excellent nutrient boost to breakfast a few times a week.

 

Watch out for our keto granola coming soon…

In the meantime, check out our other low sugar granola or buy healthy cereals at wholesale prices from our online bulk food store.

 


This Article was reproduced with permission from Opera Food’s article:- “Can you eat granola on keto?” dated 22nd June 21

 

 

 

The benefits of cereal and milk for breakfast

The benefits of cereal and milk

The benefits of cereal and milk for breakfast, with a portion or two of fruit added, are widely accepted within the nutritional community.

Studies have shown that a balanced healthy breakfast is composed of

A 30g serving of wholegrains

A 150g portion of fruit

A 250ml serving of milk

So, it is all good to go on that granola!

Why are cereals important in our diet?

The question of the importance of cereals in our diet is a divisive one. Partly carbohydrate conundrum, with issues of gluten involved, and concern over phytic acid thrown in, the eating of grains is certainly a contentious topic. Largely, we agree on the fact that over-consumption of refined grains can lead to health problems. Yet there are many benefits associated with wholegrains.

Wholegrains are the seeds of grass type plants called cereals. Rice, wheat and sorghum are all grains. Buckwheat and quinoa are pseudo-cereals. Intact, with minimal processing, they contain a wide range of minerals, vitamins, fibre, fat, protein and carbohydrate.

A regular diet of wholegrains may help to lower the risk of heart disease and stroke and regulate blood sugar levels. Wholegrains are excellent for digestive health because they are full of fibre. Grains are also a comparatively low cost food, providing bulk to our diet.

Gluten-free cereal

For those of us with coeliac disease or gluten intolerance it can be simpler to avoid eating grains altogether but there are gluten-free grains out there. Which makes it possible to find gluten-free granola. Yay!

Sorghum and rice are both true grains that are gluten-free. Buckwheat and quinoa are not true grains, although they are gluten free.

Is quinoa a cereal grain? 

Quinoa is technically not a grain but a seed belonging to a family of leafy plants, not grasses. By definition, cereal grains belong to the family of plants known as grasses. However, quinoa is generally grouped together with wholegrains and is an excellent gluten-free grain alternative. As well as being free of gluten, quinoa is high in protein and a great source of all nine essential amino acids. It also provides fibre, iron, vitamin E, potassium, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus.

Is granola cereal?

Granola is one of the most popular breakfast cereals around. Made from cereal grains it most certainly classifies as cereal. Often made with oats as a base, granola is now available in many forms beyond the classic oat/fat/sugar scenario. One of our most popular varieties is a gluten-free granola made with quinoa, rice, sorghum and buckwheat.

Buckwheat cereal

As a gluten-free option, cereal made from buckwheat is becoming increasingly popular. Like quinoa, buckwheat is actually a seed. It has a robust nutty flavour with a slightly bitter undertone and is, in fact, what soba noodles are made from.

Is cereal with almond milk healthy?

is cereal with almond milk healthy

Although nutritionists agree on the benefits of cereal and milk for breakfast, and that dairy forms an important part of that particular nutritional combo, there is an increasing number of people turning to non-dairy milks such as almond milk. Commercial almond milk often has added ingredients in the form of fillers and preservatives. It can also have added sugar. It is however easy enough to make your almond milk at home with just almonds and water. Many shop-bought almond milks do have the benefit of being fortified with calcium and Vitamin D. Chipped and broken grades of Almonds can be a perfect way to buy these highly nutritional nuts for food ingredients where presentation of the kernel is not important.

Low-sugar cereals

The nutritional quality of your breakfast not only depends on choosing wholegrains but also making sure that you only opt for low-sugar cereals too. Many brands of wholegrain cereal will be full of added sugar, so again it is a matter of reading the label carefully.

Vegan cereal

Many cereals are vegan. Look for good quality varieties and always read the label. You can find out here what goes into the best granola. Usually it is the choice of milk that determines how vegan your breakfast is so stick with something like almond milk and you are good to go.

How much cereal should you eat for breakfast?

The recommended portion of cereal is 30g. The only way to be accurate with this is to weigh it. If you stick to the same cereal you can measure your weighed portion of cereal so that you do not need to weigh it every time. For a new cereal though, it is best to weigh it out.

Does eating cereal make you gain weight?

You shouldn’t gain weight by eating cereal if you stick to the recommended portion size and always choose low-sugar varieties. There is some evidence that cereal can help to control weight. If it has plenty of fibre it can help to fill you up and satiate hunger, as well as control blood sugar levels and aid insulin resistance. It is also suggested that magnesium can help to burn calories more efficiently.

 

We have many healthy breakfast cereals to choose from and all of our muesli and granola is available to buy in bulk.

 

 

Cranberry Crunch Granola – a Healthy Breakfast Cereal – On Sale 1kg $8

Cranberry Crunch Granola

Cranberry Crunch Organic Granola, a healthy breakfast cereal by Plum Foods, is On Sale as a monthly Special right now at $8 per large 1kg pack at operafoods.com.au

Our Cranberry Crunch is a majority organic ingredient granola. Manufactured in Sydney by Plum Foods, this is a really crunchy and crispy granola. Plum Foods want consumers to get to know some of their other granola products (we  are famous for Maple Nut Crunch), so they are offering an introductory deal to see if you like this variety.

You can make an easy breakfast with Cranberry Crunch granola. Cranberry Crunch granola contains no sugar or artificial preservatives.  Cranberries contain phytonutrients particularly proanthocyanidin antioxidants that are important for all-round wellness. Berries provide several health benefits including protection from urinary tract infection, tooth cavities and inflammatory diseases. Our whole food natural ingredients are majority either organic or pesticides free. Cranberry crunch granola is a stable mate to one of the best selling breakfast cereals in Australia.

Cranberry Crunch granola is foil lined pack with zip seal in order to keep freshness. Cranberry crunch granola 1kg is perfect for large families or cafes whereas cranberry crunch granola 500g is ideal for home use.

Visit Opera Foods online gourmet store to know more information about the granola products. Book your favorite product now and get online discounts on this product.